How to Prevent Microbial Growth in Your Fuel Tanks?

In recent years, our on-farm fuel storage systems needed to undergo a lot of beautiful changes. Without these changes, it will be left out by modernity.

Like for instance, fuel tanks of today are built with improved efficiency and safety.

But even so, proper maintenance habits and practices are still necessary to protect the fuel it is trying to contain. 

The presence of microbial and fungal contamination in-home fuel storage tanks will readily create a drudgery of challenges to us, such as:

  • fuel flow problems
  • increased rates of corrosion
  • plugged filters
  • reduced combustion efficiency
  • injector malfunctions

Microbial Growth in Home Diesel Storage Tanks

The presence of fungi or bacteria in your liquid fuel can induce microbial growth. And this is likely to happen when the prevailing conditions inside your fuel containment tanks are conducive for them to grow. The presence of water inside your fuel storage tank, regardless of how scanty the amount is, and diesel fuel temperature that is between 10 C to 40 C, usually work hand in hand to promote bacterial growth. 

Fungal spores that are normally identifiable in the ground soil can find their way to your tank through its venting system. Or at times, it could occur via contamination during filling. Water vapor condensation inside the void space of your tank can provide the perfect breeding ground for microbes to thrive and grow. These are usually identified in the fuel-water interface located at the bottom part of your fuel storage tank. 

tanks warehouse

The outset of microbial growth will eventually induce biomass production and you can easily identify because it usually takes on the appearance of dark slime. Some are saying that it has a very close resemblance to a chocolate mousse. Under extreme conditions, this sludge may accumulate on the bottom part of your liquid storage tank and cause clogging of your filter systems.  

Prevention of Microbial Growth

There could be no easier or better way to keep microbial growth from happening than by limiting the amount of water that can accumulate inside your storage tank. Paramount to this is making a regular inspection on tank bottoms, every month initially, to see if no water could be found. Ideally, the bottom of fuel tanks should be inspected for water presence, a minimum of 2 times a year. 

Another effective measure that will also get the job done right would be draining the water deposited at the bottom part of the fuel storage tank by mechanical methods. Some fuel storage tanks are also equipped with drain plugs already, and thus can be a good alternative also. 

It is also a good safety measure to equip fuel tanks with filters. Doing so will significantly help in keeping fungal spores and bacteria for getting easy access to your tank. 

Periodic cleaning, inspection, and maintenance – all these three work assignments are part and parcel of keeping your fuel tank at its most tiptop shape. Leaving only one of them behind will run the risk of jeopardizing your tanks in the peril of acquiring microbial contamination.